Author: Brazil Talk

Media, National Politics, Society

Confirmation bias and the impeachment: How social media in Brazil helped alienate public opinion


by Fernanda Nogueira, Co-Editor and Writer at Brazil Talk

Over 90% of Brazilians use social media to read the news, and 70% of them have Facebook as their main source[1]. It is a global trend, and it presents serious risks to public participation in politics, for the simple fact that one can select exactly what type of news one wishes to see. Even worse, based on your profile information, social media instruments now develop algorithms that determine what reaches your newsfeed, tailored to your tastes and beliefs[2].  This allows people to avoid opinions with which one would otherwise disagree. This conduct has led to an alienation of public opinion in Brazil and abroad and has divided people into very distant groups in face of recent events, such as the president’s impeachment, hindering real civic participation in such an important time.

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National Politics, Society

An Urban War Zone – The violent crisis in the Espirito Santo state.


*Protest of residents in front of the police headquarters in Vitoria.
Photo credit:  Agência Brasil Fotografias – February 07, 2017

by Mario Saraiva, Co Editor and Writer at Brazil Talk

In an exclusive interview, a retired colonel of the Espirito Santo military police, Colonel José Nivaldo, explained the complexity of the wave crime in the State.

“I have been a police officer for 40 years and I have never seen anything close to this [situation in Espirito Santo]”.

“[The strike] started on Friday. By Saturday we had a state-wide dissatisfaction. Sunday, during the day, night, and Monday morning, a disproportionate number of crimes against patrimony, looting, thefts and homicides took place throughout the state.”

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Blog, Events, National Politics

‘In Moro we trust’ or ‘Coup promoter’: The danger of football politics


by Isabela Messias, Co Editor and Writer at Brazil Talk

It is 9:30am, and the “Institution-Building, Governance and Compliance in Brazil”[1]conference organized and co-hosted by Columbia University just finished setting things up to receive Sergio Moro, the federal judge who is heading the Car Wash operation, also known as Lava Jato — the largest corruption investigation in Brazil’s history. The room is full of students, academics, scholars and journalists, waiting for Moro to go up on stage. As he does, however, the unexpected happens: amidst thunderous claps, outraged protests erupt from the audience. One woman, who had to be escorted out, yells “Biased! Coup!”. Another person joins the chorus, reading as loudly as possible a protest letter. On the opposite third person, dressed in a Brazilian football t-shirt, angrily holds a sign that says “In Moro We Trust”, and screams “shut up” while booing. Needless to say, it was mayhem, which delayed Moro’s statement for at least twenty minutes. (more…)