Part 2 – 2018 Election Series: What Nobody Wants to Say about the Current Political Crisis in Brazil

This article is part of Brazil Talk’s 2018 Elections Series  and is intended to give our readers a deeper understanding of the Brazilian political system, its complex electoral process and gather diverse perspectives and opinions on what the world should expect from Brazil in the upcoming months and the future of the country at the beginning of 2019. 

By Rodrigo R. Soares

[5 min read]

A lot has been said about the political fragmentation in the current pre-electoral scenario in Brazil. This fragmentation has been mostly interpreted as reflecting increased radicalization, and seen as a manifestation of the underlying political preferences of a significant fraction of society. It is undeniable that there has been an increased degree of political radicalization in Brazilian society and that this radicalization also manifests itself in the pre-electoral scenario. However,  I believe most of this fragmentation comes from the increasing lack of representativeness of the political system and its detachment from the demands and preferences of a major part of the Brazilian population.

The current fragmentation can find its closest historical precedent in the first direct presidential elections, in 1989, after the end of the military dictatorship, when over 20 candidates were registered in the first round –  5 of which got more than 8% of the votes, and, 7 got close to 5% or more. The worrisome difference with this precedent is that, then, despite the disappointing outcome of the election and the ensuing impeachment process, the country was coming out of a military dictatorship and there was a lot of faith in the democratic institutions and the recently born political system. In addition, an extensive and diversified gallery of leading figures in the fight against dictatorship offered political alternatives that seemed electorally feasible and morally legitimate. We no longer have the luxury of relying on figures anointed by history to exercise political leadership. This generation has passed, and the country must move on, willingly or not.

Continue reading “Part 2 – 2018 Election Series: What Nobody Wants to Say about the Current Political Crisis in Brazil”

Institution-building, Governance and Compliance in Brazil: Politics, Policy and Business

On February 6-7, the Lemann Center for Brazilian Studies at Columbia University and the Janey Program in Latin American Studies at the New School for Social Research, in New York will bring together leading practitioners, scholars and high-profile public officers to discuss the effects of Carwash Operation in Brazil’s current and future institutional framework. What has changed so far in terms of political, policy and business practices? For how long? Is there room for further institutional improvements? Is the system reformable? How is the Operation helping to support a market-based development agenda grounded on the rule of law? How are national and foreign investors reacting to these changes and challenges? What comes next for Brazil?

Featured Guest Speakers

Cármen Lúcia Antunes Rocha 
is the Chief Justice of the Brazilian Supreme Court.

Sérgio Fernando Moro is a Brazilian federal judge who has gained national and international fame for commanding the prosecution of the crimes identified in the investigation nicknamed Operação Lava-Jato (Carwash, in English), a corruption probe involving government officials and business executives.

Paulo Roberto Galvão is a Brazilian federal prosecutor, member of the Carwash Operation Task Force which negotiates plea bargains with high-profile politicians and businessmen accused of wrongdoings.

  • RSVP for February 6th at Columbia University here
  • RSVP for February 7th at the New School here

For more information please visit the event’s official page:

http://www.ilas.columbia.edu/centers-and-programs/brazil-center/institution-building-governance-and-compliance-in-brazil-politics-policy-and-business/ 

The Pride of Being Brazilian – Film Screening and A Conversation with Adalberto Piotto

Brazil Talk invites to the film screening of ‘The Pride of Being Brazilian’ — ‘Orgulho de Ser Brasileiro’ — followed by a conversation with director Adalberto Piotto on October 29, from 6:30 to 8:30 in IAB 405.

Continue reading “The Pride of Being Brazilian – Film Screening and A Conversation with Adalberto Piotto”

Event with Tereza Campello, Brazil’s Minister of Social Development and Fight Against Hunger

Last week, Brazil Talk participated in an event with Brazil’s Minister of Social Development and Fight Against Hunger, Tereza Campello, at Columbia University. Mrs. Campello is responsible for the leading widely recognized programs such as Fome Zero and Bolsa Família, two of the most important social policies adopted by Brazil in the last decades. Minister Campello discussed the social impacts of these policies in the last ten years. Prof. Albert Fishlow, Prof. Sidney Nakahodo (both members of Brazil Talk’s Advisory Board) and Prof. André Lara Rezende (former president of the Brazilian Development Bank – BNDES) were also present at the event.

Check out the pictures!

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Cidade Democrática: Open Innovation Challenges on Public Issues

In partnership with Brazil Foundation and the Center for Brazilian Studies, Brazil Talk invites you to “Cidade Democrática: Open Innovation Challenges on Public Issues,” a talk by Rodrigo Bandeira, CEO of Cidade Democrática, at the School of International and Public Affairs, Columbia University – May 18 12:00 PM.


School of International and Public Affairs (SIPA)
420 West 118th Street
Room 802, 8th floor
New York, NY 10027